Massage Therapy

Touching the body where it hurts is as basic an instinct as eating when hungry and sleeping when tired. Cave paintings in the Pyrenees from 15,000 years ago show injuries being treated with massage. In the 4th century, BC, Hippocrates stated, "The physician must be experienced in many things, but most assuredly in rubbing."

Massage, whether delivered by a professional masseur or a layperson can be a powerful relaxant. As  healing therapy, massage works to improve the circulation into and out of the muscles, eliminating the build up waste products such as lactic acid that occurs when muscles are overworked and chronically tense.

  Return to the menu page   NIH Massage Therapy

How to Give a Massage:

Massage to promote healing from injury or illness should only be given by a trained masseuse. Be sure to read the notes on when a massage is not warranted. 

Do Not Massage:     top of this page

Swedish Massage:     top of this page

 A therapist trained in Swedish massage uses five basic strokes to relieve muscle tension and loosen sore joints.

Benefits of Massage:     top of this page

  Return to the menu page   NIH Massage Therapy