Biofeedback

Biofeedback therapy is a method of learning to consciously regulate normally unconscious (or involuntary) bodily functions in order to improve overall health. Electronic instruments monitor the body's physiology and displays this information back to the patient. The awareness of the physiological activity in various parts of the body allows the subject to evaluate the body's functioning. Once an understanding of how the body responds to a given problem, such as stress or stress-related problems, is achieved, the therapist then works with the patient to teach them how to reduce or eliminate the sources by re-patterning the physiological responses. 

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How it Works

Biofeedback instruments are highly sensitive electronic devices that monitor physiological process. Signals from the body are amplified by the instrument and converted into usable information. Biofeedback instruments may have meters, light, computer display, or tones which presents the information to the trainee or patient. Most of the current devices use computers which allows various ways to present the feedback. Examples of some widely used measurements include: 

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Use for Stress Management 

One of the most popular uses for biofeedback is to help a patient control excessive stress in their life. While some stress is good and helps one to act effectively, too much can cause an imbalance in body systems. Generally speaking, stress may be classified either by type or by level of response.

Types of Stress: 

Levels of Stress Response:

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Conditions Benefited

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